Category Archives: Uncategorized

Happy Birthday Paul McCartney!

Happy 75th Birthday to Paul McCartney! Here are some pics I’ve taken of Paul over the years.

Richard Porter with Paul McCartney, Abbey Road, 1997
Paul McCartney outside AIR Studios 1982
Paul outside AIR Studios 1983
Paul at his ‘pop up’ concert in Covent Garden, London 2013

An afternoon with George’s Photos and Lyrics, Olivia Harrison- and Woody Harrelson!

Yes, that was some day. I had my usual Beatles walk in the morning, and afterwards went to the ‘I Me Mine’ Exhibition at the Elms Lesters Painting Room, just off Charing Cross Road. On the outside wall was a huge poster of George, so we knew we were in the right place :>) The exhibition is loads of photos of George, framed and displayed beautifully, but the highlight is a huge display of George’s hand written lyrics!
The nicest was George’s song to Ringo.
We were there about an hour, and was looking through some amazing Genesis Publications books, when Olivia Harrison walked in. She came right up to us, and remarked on how good the books were. We were looking at the new version of ‘Songs By George Harrison’ and she remarked she hadn’t seen it yet herself :>)
Olivia gave some interviews to some media people and chatted to some of the guests. Then,about 20 minutes later, Woody Harrelson and his family came in – that was a real surprise! Woody and Olivia greeted each other as old friends.
I bought a copy of I Me Mine, and one of the organisers asked if I wanted it signed, and took it over to Olivia to sign it :>)
The exhibition is on at Elms Lesters Painting Rooms, 1-3-5 Flitcroft Street, London, WC2H 8DH from Friday to Sunday. The exhibition is free, and you can buy a copy of I Me Mine, which if you buy it at the exhibition, comes with a very nice cotton bag and poster. You can order many others of Genesis Publications amazing books.

‘Kenwood’, John Lennon’s ‘stockbroker belt’ Residence

John Lennon bought ‘Kenwood’, a large house on the exclusive St. George’s Hill Estate, for £20,000 on 15 July 1964, on the advice of The Beatles’ accountants, Dr Walter Strach and James Isherwood. Lennon was resident with wife Cynthia, and son Julian, from the summer of 1964, until the late spring of 1968.  Although John only paid £20,000 to buy it, he spent another £40,000 renovating it. The renovations went on for the first nine months the Lennons lived here, and in the end they were forced to occupy the staff flat at the top of the house. During this time it seemed like hundreds of workmen were forever in and out of the house, and John and Cyn were presented with designs for the house which were very beautiful but a long way from reality.

John admitted to biographer, Ray Coleman, that he never liked living at Kenwood – he felt hemmed in by its ‘bourgeois’ atmosphere. Also he probably felt envious that Paul McCartney was living in Central London as a bachelor, while John was stuck in the ‘stockbroker belt’ with a wife and young son.

Marilyn Demmen with John Lennon, outside ‘Kenwood’ in 1968

At first the fans didn’t know where the Lennon’s had moved to, but it didn’t take long for the fans to find out and descend on this normally quiet private estate. However, the atmosphere at Kenwood was very laid back. Kenny Everett remembers visiting Kenwood – by accident. “We were leaving a club in London, the Speakeasy. John was there, and we went outside after we’d finished clubbing and he said ‘Do you want a lift?’ and I said ‘Yeah, I live in Lower Sloane Street’ and he said ‘Oh great, we’ll drop you off’.

“So I jumped into the back of this gigantic car. It was John’s friend Terry Doran driving, with one arm out of the window and one finger on the wheel – he was a maniac! When we got to Lower Sloane Street he went straight past my house and I thought ‘I’d rather be in this car than in my house. So I kept quiet in the back and before we knew it, we were in Weybridge at his house and I stayed a couple of days. It was rather fun. It was a gigantic, stockbrokery sort of place, mock Tudor monster and yards of lawn.”

“There was an occasion in the house, when there was a girl spotted at the door. She’d somehow climbed over the wall. And someone said ‘Oh John, there’s a fan at the door.’ John walked all the way down the path and chatted to her for a while and then just gently led her out and said goodbye. And I thought that was very pleasant, he could have had her shot or unleashed the odd dog. But he went out to speak to her, that was rather sweet.”

There were a steady stream of fans visiting Kenwood, and John would often go out to see them, to post for pictures or give autographs. On some occasions, he would invite fans into the house and give them food and drink. One such fan was Marilyn Demmen, who visited Kenwood on many occasions. One day she was invited in, and saw that John had a bookshelf full of his own books ‘In His Own Write’ and ‘A Spaniard in the Works’. Marilyn laughed about it, and in response, John got a book from the shelf, signed it, and gave it to Marilyn.

While living at Kenwood, John’s father Freddie re-entered his life. John had not seen his father since he was five, when his mother and father split up, and Freddie had gone to sea. By 1965 Freddie was working in Hampton Court washing dishes when he met someone that had driven the Beatles for a hire car firm and remarked to Freddie that he knew where his son was living. Freddie decided to turn up unannounced and perplexed poor Cynthia, who was home alone. Cynthia told Ray Coleman, “There was no way I could have shut the door on him. He looked like a tramp, but he was John’s dad. I had no alternative but to ask him to wait for John to return.” When John did return, he was not overjoyed to see his father, as it became obvious he was looking for a handout – but, through persuasion by Cynthia, Freddie stayed for a few nights. The reconciliation was not a success; John later told journalist Maureen Cleeve, “It was only the second time in my life I’d seen him – I showed him the door. I wasn’t having him in the house.” Despite this obviously uneasy meeting John did buy Freddie a house and had a distant relationship with his father until Freddie died in the 1970’s.When Beatles biographer Hunter Davies visited Kenwood in 1967, John would often be sitting with his face just inches from a TV screen (he was so short-sighted, it was the only way he could see it!) or would be sitting alone by the swimming pool, lost in a world of his own.

John Lennon outside ‘Kenwood’

In May 1968 John invited Yoko Ono to visit him here. They made some tapes together that they eventually released as the Unfinished Music Volume One LP (better known as Two Virgins). Then they made love. A few hours later, Cynthia came home unexpectedly early from holiday, and found John and Yoko together. John and Yoko then moved to Ringo’s flat in London. Kenwood was sold when John and Cynthia divorced.

This article is adapted from ‘Guide to the Beatles London’ by Richard Porter. For more on the book, and to order a copy, see http://www.beatlescoffeeshop.com/shop/product.php/2/guide_to_the_beatles_london__guide_book_by_richard_porter

 

GEORGE HARRISON – I ME MINE – LYRICS & WRITINGS Pop Up Exhibition

## FREE POP UP EXHIBITION ##

A very rare opportunity to see George Harrison’s handwritten lyrics on display

Friday 16th June – Sunday 18th June 2017

Elms Lesters Painting Rooms, 1-3-5 Flitcroft Street, London, WC2H 8DH

Genesis Publications hosts a free exhibition celebrating the U.K. launch of the book, I ME MINE – The Extended Edition by George Harrison.

Visitors to the pop-up exhibition will have a rare chance to see reproductions of Harrison’s handwritten lyrics as well as personal photographs and commentary taken from the new book. The closest to an autobiography of George Harrison that has been published, I ME MINE – The Extended Edition covers -for the first time- the full span of his life and work, with his handwritten lyrics to 141 songs, observations by Harrison himself and photographs from the family albums.

Originally published in 1980, The Extended Edition includes lyrics and photographs discovered recently by his wife Olivia, including a collection of lyrics found in a piano bench at Harrison’s home studio. One such song was ‘Hey Ringo’, thought to be from 1970/1971, and previously unseen – including by Ringo Starr himself who first saw the lyrics at the recent Los Angeles exhibition of the book.

Rare limited edition books also on display will include: I Me Mine (original 1980 edition), Songs by George Harrison 1 and 2, Concert for George, Fifty Years Adrift and Live in Japan. Visitors will also enjoy a preview of the recently announced Revolver 50 Collage series by Klaus Voormann, Love That Burns – A Chronicle of Fleetwood Mac by Mick Fleetwood, Transformer by Lou Reed & Mick Rock, and the Genesis 100 special box set celebrating 100 editions since 1974.

Also on show will be the full range of Genesis Publications’ limited edition, signed books and prints.   Publications and prints by artists such as Jimmy Page, Ronnie Wood, Ringo Starr, Yoko Ono, Pete Townshend, Bob Dylan, Paul Weller and Jeff Beck will be displayed alongside those featuring the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, The Beatles, Traveling Wilburys, The Who as well as the recent Vogue – Voice Of A Century anthology.

For more info see

i-me-mine-exhibition.com

 

June 3rd 1964 – Ringo Collapses Before World Tour

3rd June 1964. Just before flying off on a world tour, the Beatles pose for photos at Prospect Studios in Barnes, for the Saturday Evening Post. They are dress as city gents, wearing suits and bowler hats. During the session, Ringo complained of feeling ill, and collapsed. He was rushed to University College Hospital where he was diagnosed with tonsillitis. Ringo was in no fit state to go on the tour, and it was too late to cancel, so replacement drummer Jimmy Nicol was bought in.
Ringo recovered in time to join the tour in Australia.

Ringo about to collapse during a photo session

Sgt Pepper – I’d Love to Turn You On.

In an article originally written for the London Beatles Fanclub Magazine, Esther Shafer writes about the Beatles Classic album, which was released 50 years ago….

Sgt Pepper – An Appreciation of a Classic Album

Believe it or not, I got into a conversation with three Beatle fans who told me they don’t think Sgt. Pepper is a very good album. Now, this is as incomprehensible to me as someone saying they don’t like ice cream, chocolate, or blue skies. Totally blown away by this revelation, I was unable to come up with much more than ‘Why not’. got two basic reasons:

1) The songs on Sgt.Pepper aren’t as good as those on Revolver.

2) Being second generation fans, they were born too late to appreciate the mood of the times, and Sgt. Pepper is to them very much tied to the 60′ s.

I went away to collect my thoughts. Okay, so maybe there is such a thing as a generation gap. My mind drifted back to my youth, the summer of 67 when I was sixteen and Sgt. Pepper became permanently imprinted on my consciousness. If they don’t get the meaning of Sgt. Pepper, then I will try to help them.

So, for all of you poor lost souls, I am prescribing three exercises.

Exercise one Make believe it’s your first time.

Make absolutely sure you will be totally uninterrupted for 39 minutes and 52 seconds. Unplug the telephone, lock yourself in a room if you have to. Arrange your body in your best listening to albums position. It might be lying on your bed, on your couch, on the floor. Just make sure you have no limits to how loud you can play the music. If you have nervous parents, roommates, or neighbors, headphones are recommended. A CD would prevent you from having to turn the record over, but purists will want to listen to the album (a slightly scratched model from the 60’s is best with pops and clicks from well listened to tracks). Anyway, you will need an actual album for exercise three.

Choose a time of day when you are at your best. If it’s a nice day, open the windows, lie in a patch of sunlight, burn some incense, or surround yourself with flowers. Clear your mind of all thoughts, close your eyes, and just listen. Pay special attention to the way the instruments, sound effects and background vocals blend together. Relax and breathe deeply.

When you are finished listening to the entire album, stand up, stretch, and go outside. You should be in a somewhat sobered mood, after listening to A Day in the Life. Experience your surroundings, whatever they may be. You’re taking the time for a number of things that weren’t important yesterday. Really look at a flower or a tree. Look at the clouds in the sky. Watch a bird, or a squirrel. Even if your front door leads out to a busy street, that’s okay too. Listen to the traffic sounds, other peoples’ voices. Watch the people walking here and there. Imagine all the human dramas that are being played out around you. Watch an old couple, two young people flirting. Stay out as long as the mood maintains. You are finished. Good work.

Exercise Two Awakening the Unconscious

For the next few days, play the album as background music. Pretend it’s 1967. Anywhere you went, you could hear the sounds wafting out of windows, on car radios. Your friends are playing it on their stereo. They turn the record over and over, all day long. Your mind will tune out the parts you don’t really care for. Then all of a sudden, while doing something totally irrelevant, you will find yourself humming a tune, or remembering a guitar riff. Then you know you have accomplished your goal. Bonus points for remembering how one song blends into another. You’ve really made it when you can imagine the order of the songs without thinking too long about it.

Exercise Three – Traveling Through Space and Time.

It’s 1967. For months you have heard about the revolutionary design of the Beatles’ new album cover. Start with the front. Your eyes glance from one figure to another. You won’t be able to identify them all. Notice the lower half of the cover. You keep noticing more and more detail. Some of it looks very strange to you. Now open the cover. The Beatles look very different to you now. Their eyes look rounder, and you can see far, far into them. With their moustaches, they don’t look quite the same.

Now your eyes rest on their costumes. The shiny material, the decorations. Look how much they have changed since 1963. Thrown off the old dark suits, the same uniform. Now they are all wearing different colors. Let your mind wander back to your childhood. What did you want to be when you grew up? A policeman with shiny brass buttons? A fireman in a big red hat? A meter maid? An Indian princess? Superman? How would you really like to present yourself to the world? Express the real you. Braid flowers in your hair. Grow your hair as long as you want. Embroider flowers and sew patches on your jeans. Wear slogans on your shirts. Throw away those uniforms of conformity and be yourself. The Beatles say it’s ok.

Now look at the back cover. Let your eyes wander over the lyrics. Think of the range of human emotion that is played out on this album. Things are getting better all the time – hard times are over. The heady excitement of flirtation Lovely Rita, Meter Maid. The kind of love our gradparents have – no passion, just contentment – When I’m 64. A bit lacking in self–confidence? – I Get by with Little Help From my Friends. The heartbreak of broken relationships – She’s Leaving Home. The mania that comes from living in a rat race – Good Morning, Good Morning – and then it all comes crashing down on your head with the realization that it’s all futile because it’ll all end anyway – A Day in the Life.

I could get really heavy now, and tell you how the album is a microcosm of life – or remind you that this was the first “theme” album, and therefore it can’t possibly be compared to Revolver. The songs on Revolver are precious and rare jewels – each stands alone and shines in it’s own perfection. But Sgt. Pepper is rather like a novel – you can’t just pick up the book, open it randomly, and read one chapter, expecting to grasp the story in it’s entirety. But by this time, you should be making profound statements and having mind-blowing revelations of your own. And if not – well, I’d love to turn you on . . .

Esther Shafer

A certain well know  album cover

Sgt Pepper Documentary on BBC Radio 2 Tonight.

Martin Freeman presents Sgt. Pepper Forever, which will reveal the revolutionary studio techniques used during the remarkable sessions dating from November 1966 to April 1967 and also examine the album’s huge impact on the history of music. They will feature ‘work-in-progress’ versions of Sgt. Pepper tracks – and the songs on the double A-side single Strawberry Fields Forever/Penny Lane, which were also recorded during the sessions – to illustrate the pioneering techniques used by The Beatles and George Martin.

This two-part documentary special features interviews with Paul, George, Ringo and George Martin, and in a new interview composer Howard Goodall talks about, and illustrates on piano, the musical innovations of the album’s songs.

Having worked with the original four-track tapes to create a new stereo mix of Sgt. Pepper for its 50th anniversary, producer Giles Martin (son of Sir George Martin) describes the innovative recording techniques used at the time and how he approached making his new version.

There will also be interview material with the album cover’s co-designer Peter Blake, Beatles press officer Derek Taylor, Tony King (George Martin’s assistant in 1967), Mike Leander (the arranger of She’s Leaving Home), poet Adrian Mitchell, DJ John Peel and some of the producers and musicians who were influenced by the achievements of the album, including T Bone Burnett, Dave Grohl, Tom Petty, Jimmy Webb and Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys.

Martin Freeman says: “Sgt. Pepper is the most celebrated album by my favourite band. These documentaries will shed light on how The Beatles, with George Martin, created a piece of work that marked a watershed for what a long playing record could be. It’s my absolute pleasure to help tell you about it.”.

Sgt Pepper Forever – BBC Radio 2 – 10:00 pm Wednesday 24th May – and online afterwards. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08qqgm0

The Beatles In Chelsea

During the 1960s, the Chelsea area of London was the most fashionable, and proved to be a magnet for the rich and famous to live, shop and party. The Beatles were no exceptions. Here are some of the many places the Beatles frequented:

We go down the Kings Road on our Swinging 60s bus tour. For more info see http://www.60sbus.london

 Royal Court Hotel ( Now Sloane Square Hotel)

This four star hotel, right on fashionable Sloane Square, was the hotel of choice for the Beatles on their many trips to London from June 1962 to the summer of 1963.

They first came here on June 5th 1962, in preparation for their first recording session with George Martin at EMI Studios, Abbey Road, the following day.

Chelsea and the Kings Road was already a very fashionable area and the Beatles had time to explore the boutiques, restaurants and bars that attracted the rich and famous.

The Beatles returned to the Royal Court Hotel in early September 1962, when they recorded their first single, ‘Love Me Do’ at EMI.

By early 1963, the Beatles had become nationally famous, especially after ‘Please Please Me’ reached number one in the UK charts, and their trips to London had to become much more frequent. Another notable occasion was when they came down to record the Please Please Me LP. They arrived on February 10th, ready to record the album the next day. But, rather than rest up in preparation for the recording session, they did an extensive photo session with Cyrus Andrews, in the hotel and around Sloane Square.  You can see photos from the session at http://www.multiplusbooks.com/630210.html

Ringo with a fan outside the Royal Court Hotel, early 1963

The Royal Court Hotel remained the Beatles London base until the summer of 1963, when they transferred to the President Hotel in Guilford Street, Bloomsbury.

102 Edith Grove

This was a student flat, rented by Mick Jagger, and also occupied by Keith Richards and Brian Jones. The Beatles saw the Rolling Stones play at the Crawdaddy Club in Richmond on April 14th 1963, and the Stones invited the Beatles back to their digs for a party afterwards. The flat was a typical student pad, and hadn’t been cleaned for months. However, the Beatles probably didn’t mind, because compared to their former digs, behind a filthy cinema in Hamburg, Edith Grove seemed like luxury! Despite the rivalry between their fans, the Beatles and the Stones remained friends throughout their careers.

Penny Lane in the Kings Road!

John Lennon came to the Kings Road in February 1967 – to shoot a scene for the Beatles ‘Penny Lane’ video! He was filmed walking past Markham Square, near Mary Quant’s ‘Bazaar’ boutique.

Chelsea Manor Studios 1-11 Flood Street

Chelsea Manor Studios opened in 1902, and has been used by artists, photographers and writers. It’s most famous photo session took place here on March 30th 1967, when the Beatles came here to have their picture taken for the cover of their new album ‘Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’.

The Beatles arrived in the late afternoon for the album cover shoot, which was devised by an amalgamation of talent. Art-directed by Robert Fraser, designed by Peter Blake and his then wife Jann Haworth, and photographed by Michael Cooper. The look of the album, the colourful collage of life-sized cardboard models depicting more than 70 famous people on the front of the album cover and lyrics printed on the back cover, was the first time this had been done on an English pop LP.

For more on the album cover shoot, see http://www.thebeatles.com/photo-album/making-cover-sgt-peppers-lonely-hearts-club-band

Chelsea Manor Studios now holds luxury apartments.

A certain well known album cover

Granny Takes a Trip – 488 Kings Road

‘Granny’ was opened by Nigel Waymouth, his girlfriend Sheila Cohen and John Pearse, after looking for an outlet for Sheila’s collection of antique clothes. The premises had been acquired in 1965 and opened in December after Pearse, who was a Savile Row-trained tailor, agreed to join them. Waymouth came up with the curious name  and the boutique was featured in the famous ‘London – the Swinging City’ issue of ‘Time’ Magazine. Around the same time, Nigel Waymouth began to design posters and record covers under the name Hapshash and the Coloured Coat with fellow artist, Michael English. Their posters were used exclusively to pubicise concerts at the Savile Theatre, which was owned by  Brian Epstein.

All of the The Beatles are known to have shopped here, along with their wives and girlfriends.

It was, however, more famous for its external appearance(s), including the 1966 mural of a native American chief and the 1967 ‘Jean Harlow’ mural. Most famous of all is probably the 1948 Dodge saloon car which appeared to have crashed through the wall and onto the forecourt. The car was also subjected to colour makeovers – canary yellow and, most memorably, in black and gold with glittering stars. The Dodge feature was kept after the sale of the shop in 1969 until complaints from the local authorities forced its removal in 1971. The clothes, though of very high quality, were very high-priced and tended to attract an ‘elite’ clientele, which just added to its legendary status. . Pearse was unhappy with the increasingly ‘hippie’ image of the shop and eventually they ended up selling the business in 1969. The London premises at 488 closed in 1974, the name being sold to Byron Hector who opened a shop under the same name elsewhere on Kings Road, eventually closing in 1979.

Granny Takes a Trip 2

Club Dell’ Aretusa 107 Kings Rd

Opened by famed restauranteur Alvaro Maccioni, who teamed up with Apicella and Mino Parlanti (owner of the equally celebrated Borgo San Frediano) to open Club dell’Aretusa, a large members-only bar/restaurant/disco on the King’s Road. “Are you one of the beautiful people?” demanded Angus McGill’s double-page feature in the Evening Standard. “Simple test: Can you get in to the Dell’Aretusa?”

On May 22nd 1968, John Lennon and George Harrison attended a party here to launch ‘Apple Tailoring’ which was opening just down the road at 161 Kings Road. George was with his wife Pattie, but John was with his new girlfriend, Yoko Ono. They had got together just a few days earlier, and this was their first public appearance together, much to the interest of the gathered media, who kept on asking John ‘Where’s your wife?’ Ironically, George Harrison wore a jacket which he bought from rival clothes shop, Granny Takes a Trip (see above!)

George and Pattie Harrison walking to Apple Tailoring

 

John and Yoko walking down the Kings Road

Apple Tailoring (Civil and Theatrical) 161 Kings Road

Apple Tailoring, which opened on May 23rd 1968,  was the latest addition to the Beatles growing Apple group of companies – they already had a boutique on Baker Street.

The Beatles had known the shop for a while. Before their involvement, it was called Dandie Fashions. ‘Dandie Fashions’ was the brainchild of  John Crittle. He arrived from Australia around 1964, and  it didn’t take John long to get himself established amongst London’s young and hip in-crowd. A fortunate turn of events landed John his first real employment was at  ‘Hung On You’at 22 Cale Street, Chelsea, just off the Kings Road. It later became Jane Asher’s Cake Shop. It later relocating to 420 King’s Road.  John was  a designer and a fabric locator Owner Michael Rainey  was an already recognised aristocrat amongst the ‘Chelsea set’. This was expanded upon when he got together with, and married, London socialite, Jane Ormsby-Gore. It didn’t take that long before the intimidating ‘Hung On You’ became the shop of the stars. Rainey himself recalls: “When The Beatles and The Who started to visit my boutique, I knew we’d made it.”

John Crittle decided to set up his own boutique, and started ‘Dandie Fashion’ at 161 Kings Road in October 1966.  He also managed to secure the ‘Foster and Tara’ clothing designers for the business. Tara Browne was a well-known socialite amongst the in-crowd – being the heir to the Guinness fortune. Tara was interested in making his own way in the world, and when he moved from Ireland to London he also fell in with the young and hip from the arts and entertainment worlds. His interest in men’s clothing led him to starting up his own tailoring company, ‘Foster and Tara’. Tara had many friends in rock and pop, including Brian Jones, John Lennon and Paul McCartney. It is said that Paul McCartney took his first LSD trip with Tara.

Tara Browne was killed in a car crash while on his way to meet the team of Dudley Edwards, Douglas Binder, and David Vaughan, to discuss the design for the shop front. Browne crashed his Lotus Elan into a van parked in Redcliffe Gardens, he swerved so that he took the impact rather than his girlfriend, Suki Potier. This incident will forever be immortalised in The Beatles’ song, ‘A Day In The Life’. Tara’s untimely death also inspired The Pretty Things’ song, ‘Death Of A Socialite’.

Tara Browne and wife Nicky, as photographed by Michael Cooper

After the death of Tara Browne, John Crittle kept Dandie Fashions going, and attracted the likes of Jimi Hendrix, Roger Daltrey and Brian Jones, who all often bought clothes there.

John Crittle was also friendly with the Beatles, and in May 1968, The Beatles went into partnership with Critte to form ‘Apple Tailoring’. The purpose of this shop was to offer the discerning male customer a bespoke service, rather than the ‘off-the-peg’ service that was available at the Baker Street location. As well as this bespoke service, the basement of 161 King’s Road became a hairdressing salon, which was run by Leslie Cavendish. Apple Tailoring lasted longer than the Baker Street boutique but it too closed its doors in 1968. Apple Corps decided to withdraw from High Street commerce and handed the business and all the stock over to John Crittle. Crittle’s daughter is Darcey Bussell, former prima ballerina with the Royal Ballet, and now judge on ‘Strictly Come Dancing’.

John Lennon outside Apple Tailoring