All posts by Richard Porter

October 5th 1962 – The Beatles Release ‘Love me Do’

On October 5th 1962, the Beatles first single ‘Love Me Do’ was released. On the Parlophone ‘red label’, it featured the Beatles recording made on September 4th 1962, with Ringo Starr on drums. This was significant, as originally, the Beatles producer George Martin wasn’t happy with Ringo’s drumming that day, and had the Beatles remake ‘Love Me Do’ on September 11th with session drummer Andy White on drums. Ringo was given a tambourine to bang, much to his ever lasting chagrin.  When it came to the original release though, Ringo’s version was chosen.

Things became confusing months later when Parlophone changed its record label to a black one, and at the same time, substituted the Andy White version of  ‘Love Me Do’ as the single. This led to a big mistake decades later. On October 5th 2012, EMI were due to re-release  ‘Love Me Do’ on its 50th anniversary, in an identical packaging and recording to the original release. We were sent copies of the new single to sell in the Beatles Coffee Shop. However, just 2 days before the release date, we were send an email from EMI to say the release had been cancelled to a ‘production problem’ and that we should send the singles back. Curious to what the problem was, I took a copy home and played it. The ‘problem’ was obvious right from the first few seconds – it was the wrong version of  ‘Love Me Do’! They had used the September 11th with Andy White on drums.

Because of the problem, the re-release of  ‘Love Me Do’ was delayed for several weeks, so missed the 50th anniversary. Rather than send all the copies we had of the rejected version back, I kept a couple. (shhh, don’t tell anyone!)

There have been some more succesful celebrations of the release of ‘Love Me Do’ on its anniversaries.  On the 30th anniversary, I was invited to a special party in Studio Two at Abbey Road. As well as celebrating the anniversary, the British Council launched its new Beatles exhibition, including a video that included a section of me and members of the London Beatles Fanclub having a meeting at the Liverpool Beatles convention.

At the party, Apple MD Neil Aspinall, and reps from EMI, cut the 30th anniversary cake, which had been baked by Paul McCartney’s ex, Jane Asher!

Paul McCartney at Abbey Road Studios, October 5th 1982, the 20th anniversary of the release of Love Me Do
Paul McCartney at Abbey Road Studios, October 5th 1982, the 20th anniversary of the release of Love Me Do
The cake to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Love Me Do - as designed by Jane Asher!
The cake to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Love Me Do – as designed by Jane Asher!

October 4th 1963 – The Beatles on Ready Steady Go!

October 4th 1963 – The Beatles made their debut appearance on Ready, Steady, Go!

Broadcast on the ITV network, initially just in London, RSG! was British television’s leading pop music show at the time. The 4 October 1963 episode was broadcast live, with the performers miming to their hits, a typical situation for the time.

The show was recorded at Television House on London’s Kingsway. During the afternoon The Beatles rehearsed for the cameras, and recording took place from 6.15pm onwards. The Beatles mimed to Twist and Shout, She Loves You, and I’ll Get Tou and were interviewed by guest host,  Dusty Springfield, and host Keith Fordyce.  Also, Paul McCartney judged four teenage girls miming to Brenda Lee’s ‘Let’s Jump the Broomstick, choosing 13-year-old Melanie Coe as winner. Three years later, after Coe’s disappearance from her family made the front page of the Daily Mirror.  McCartney used the article as the basis for ‘She’s Leaving Home’.

The Beatles with Dusty Springfield, Eden Kane, Keith Fordyce, and Helen Shapiro on Ready Steady Go
The Beatles with Dusty Springfield, Eden Kane, Keith Fordyce, and Helen Shapiro on Ready Steady Go

 

3rd October 1964 – the Beatles on Shindig

On this day in 1964, the Beatles filmed a special live performance for the American TV show ‘Shindig!’ at the Granville Theatre in Fulham. The songs included Kansas City/Hey Hey Hey and I’m a Loser, from the forthcoming ‘Beatles For Sale’ album, which wouldn’t be released for another month.

The Granville Theatre, in Walham Green, Fulham, was opened in 1898 and designed by Frank Matcham, who designed many other theatres, such as the London Palladium. It was knocked down in 1971.

 

The Granville Theatre, one of Frank Matcham's most gothic designs.
The Granville Theatre, one of Frank Matcham’s most gothic designs.

October 2nd 2012 – Paul McCartney, Victor Spinetti, and a Magical Mystery Tour

October 2nd 2012 – a day I will never forget. A day I attended 2 very memorable events, with Paul McCartney at both!!

The afternoon was the memorial service to Victor Spinetti at St Paul’s Church, Covent Garden. Victor had died a few weeks before. I had got to know Victor quite well through various Beatles conventions, and interviewed him for the British Beatles Fan Club at the City Barge pub, that features in Help! I later found out that my birth mother was born only a mile or so from Victor in South Wales, and used to buy fish and chips in the Spinetti family’s fish and chip shop!

Victor had a profound effect on me, especially when I first met him at the 1981 Beatles Convention in Liverpool. I was very sad to hear about his passing, and was determined to attend his memorial service. I rang the church a few days before and told of my family connection, and was invited along.

I was amazed when I got there to see so many famous faces.

It was a lovely occasion, moving at times, but in the main, a wonderful fun celebration of Victor’s life. The tone was set by Fr. Simon Grigg, who said that during his life, Victor was an atheist – but now he knows different!
The programme was a mixture of song and readings, plus very nice tributes to Victor from Barbara Windsor and Jim Davidson.
The musical highlight was Michael Ball singing ‘In My Life’. As he put it, with one of the composers sitting feet away from him.
Fenella Fielding read John Lennon’s poem, Fat Budgie, to celebrate Victor’s collaboration with John on the play ‘In His Own Write’.
Paul McCartney arrived at the church just before the service started. It seems that he initially didn’t think he was going to make it, and sent a written tribute to be read out. Instead he read it himself.
He remembered at one of the Beatles first meetings with Victor, he told them to look at a cloud in the sky and that he would make it go away – and it did! Paul said that, when thinking of Victor that morning, he tried to do the same thing. However the cloud he got didn’t go away, it just got bigger and bigger. Paul joked that it was actually Victor.

Barbara Windsor, who was one of Victor’s best friends, remembered when they were both in a touring stage show, and due to lack of rooms, had to share a bed in a hotel. Barbara, then the ‘sex bomb’ of the ‘Carry On’ films etc, said she never felt so safe in her life! Of course, Victor was gay.
The service lasted about an 75 minutes and we left the church to a recording of the Beatles Magical Mystery Tour.
Afterwards I was mingling outside, when Paul McCartney came up to me, shook my hand and said “Hi Richard, how are you going, haven’t seen you for a while.” It’s nice he remembers me :>)

Although everyone was sad about Victor’s passing, the service was very funny in places – and Fr. Grigg said at the end that he’d never heard so many ‘F’ words in a church before!
A lovely service for a lovely man.

A section of the service – including Paul  McCartney’s speech https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFfsPFkjTEQ&playnext=1&list=PL03C5D18AB9E99DCF&feature=results_video

You can see me in the audience at about 7 mins 4 seconds :>)

A report on the service http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2211815/Actor-Victor-Spinetti-star-Beatles-films-died-aged-82-cancer-battle.html

victorprogramme1victorprogramme2

Paul McCartney arriving at St Paul's Church
Paul McCartney arriving at St Paul’s Church

Attending the service would have been a highlight of most day’s – but mine didn’t end there. That evening, I attended a special gala screening of Magical Mystery Tour. I was the guest of Jeni Crowley, who was on the original Magical Mystery Tour coach, and appears in the film. Sitting with us were Sylvia Bodhi Hillier, and Leslie Cavendish, who were also on the coach, and Roy Benson, who edited the film.
Amongst the celebrities in the audience were Liam Gallagher, Paul Weller, Neil Innes, David Walliams, Peter Asher, Barry Miles, Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam, Mark Lewisohn, and Joe Boyd. Paul McCartney was there too, and gave a short speech before the screening. He seemed surprised to see me again so soon :>) I was sitting right in front of Liam Gallagher, and I could hear him singing along to I am the Walrus.
At first we saw the BBC ‘Arena’ programme about the making of Magical Mystery Tour, and after a short break, the film itself. Magical Mystery Tour looked and sounded great on a big screen, and it was wonderful seeing it with so many of the people that appeared in it.

…A Day in the Life!!!

Pic I took of Paul with Liam Gallagher at the screening of Magical Mystery Tour
Pic I took of Paul with Liam Gallagher at the screening of Magical Mystery Tour

 

Records and Rebels of the 60s at the Victoria and Albert Museum

You Say you Want a Revolution? – Records and Rebels 1966-1970 is a fab gear new exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum – and a must visit for Beatles fans.

During the years covered by the exhibition, the Beatles wee arguably at their collective peak, and not surprisingly, feature prominently in the exhibition, including many items never seen in public before. A highlight is a display about Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, featuring the original Sgt Pepper uniforms worn by John Lennon and George Harrison; the cut outs of Oscar Wilde and Edgar Allan Poe, that are seen on the album cover; the lyrics of Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, handwritten by John; and Within You, Without You, Handwritten by George; and one of Georges own sitars. This area of the exhibition is worth the admission money on its own!

The Beatles memorabilia doesn’t end there – Yoko and Olivia have donated lots of their late husband’s mementos, including the jacket worn by John on the ‘Our World’ TV broadcast of ‘All You Need is Love’, and a purple velvet jacket worn by George on the Frost programme. Then right at the end of the exhibition, the jacket John wore on the ‘Imagine’ video. This really got to me.

One item that’s exhibited which isn’t quite what it seems is a white suit, that the exhibition book says was the one worn by John Lennon on the Abbey Road crossing, for the iconic album cover shoot. However, the book says it was designed by Ted Lapidus, when John’s Abbey Road suit was designed by Tommy Nutter in Savile Row. The suit might have belonged to John, but it wasn’t the one he wore that day.

Overall, there must be at least 25 Beatles handwritten lyrics dotted about the exhibition, surely the most ever seen in one place.

But of course, there is much more to the exhibition than just the Beatles. A highlight is certainly the Woodstock Room, where you can watch the film of the iconic festival on a huge screen, lounging on beanbags, and surrounded by loads of mementos from the various bands and artists that took part, including Roger Daltrey’s stage outfit, Pete Townshend’s broken guitar.

As well as all these stage suits and instruments etc, the exhibition includes hundreds of album covers from the period, which are very much works of art in their own right, and great concert posters.

The exhibition is not confined to music by any means. There are sections on fashion, art, politics, early computers, and space travel.

I must have spent at least 2.5 hours in the exhibition, and will definitely go back again. I came out feeling like I’d just smoked a massive joint! A very hippy, trippy, show!

 

George Harrison's Sgt Pepper suit
George Harrison’s Sgt Pepper suit
The Exhibition poster
The Exhibition poster

An Interview with Jeni Crowley

A few years ago, I was privileged to meet Jeni Crowley. She worked for the Beatles Fan Club in London, was on the Beatles Magical Mystery Tour coach, and worked at the Beatles Apple Shop on Baker Street. Jeni agreed to give me an interview about her time with the Fabs, the first time she had been interviewed by anyone about this incredible time in her life. Here it is below:

 

Were you a Beatles fan from an early age?

The first time I heard them was Love me Do. I lived in London. A friend of mine went down to the fan club and told me they needed help at any time. I used to go after school or in the school holidays. We used to go to the top floor and there would be sacks and sacks of mail and my job was to sort it out into different areas. Later on I was promoted and came down to the main floor and was answering the phones etc. As you know there are a lot of forged autographs around, done by the fan club people, and I became John Lennon! I was doing it since I was around 13 years old.

Who was the boss?

There was a lady know as Anne Collingham, Who was really a lady called mary Cochran, and Bettina Rose. They were given names. I don’t know why. When I came along my real name was Jean, but when the vacancy came along, there was already a lady called Maureen, and they said you can’t have Jean and Maureen, is there another name you go by? An aunt of mine used to call me Jennifer, so I became Jeni.

We ran the Fan Club as Maureen and Jeni. We used to write the newsletters. The offices in Monmouth Street were above a dirty bookshop and that’s where I used to go in my school uniform and change in the ladies loo on the first floor.

It closed and went to Argyle Street, then went back to Liverpool with Freda Kelly, so the actual fanclub in London folded, and Freda took it back over, and the only London area club was the one I was running with Maureen. In 1967 I suddenly got a message that Brian Epstein wanted to see me. I’d been told you don’t cross Brian Epstein. I didn’t know what I’d done. Maureen had given an interview to the press. It was around the time The Beatles had said they weren’t going to tour any more. The press had come to my house to ask me what I thought about this – and I said it was up to the Beatles. Maureen had been really irate about it though. Brian called me in to say ‘ What about this article? And I said I didn’t know anything about it. I said that I didn’t say anything to the press but the press said I was devastated and was weeping etc. Brian was brilliant, he told me how to handle the press, what to say and that if anything came up in the future I was to go to him. However, he called Maureen in and sacked her!

Brian was very protective of the Beatles.

Within a few weeks Brian had died and Magical Mystery Tour came up. I had been doing some publicity for the Bee Gees with Tony Barrow. Tony sent a telegram to the fan club area secretaries, including me, asking if we’d like to be in this film! We didn’t have a phone at the time. I ran to the phone box and said ‘No I can’t – I’m going back to school on Monday!’ I was 16 and was going to go to art college. But my dad came in from work and read the telegram, and said if you want to go, you should go. He was a big music fan. I ran back to the phone box to ask if anyone had taken my place. They said no, so on the Monday we just met up. Of course we had no mobile phones, noone knew where we were going or who with. They could have lost their daughter, but didn’t seem too bothered!

I had wanted to be a journalist and above the fan club was Disc and Music Echo, and there was a journalist there called Christine, who gave me a press pass. I used to go to Ready Steady Go and Top of the Pops and interview various people. So I had met various pop stars and was quite blasé about it. My autograph book is chocker! So to meet the Beatles wasn’t such a big deal. When I did meet them Paul was the first one – we were waiting for the coach in Alsop Place, he just said Hello. The other 3 got on at Virginia Water and we just struck up conversations. The first thing I really remember was going to a restaurant, just after we picked them up. It seemed really posh to me. The four fan club secretaries sat apart in a corner by the door. I ordered a cheese sandwich. I waited and waited for it to come and it didn’t. On the way out George came along and said ‘Have you eaten?’ and I said no, my sandwich didn’t come. George went through the doors to the kitchen and brought the chef out and said ‘She ordered a cheese sandwich!’ – as if I was someone very special. I didn’t forget that. The next day we sat in different places on the coach and he came and sat next to me and we started talking about philosophy, India etc. That was me on the inside looking out. He said ‘I’ll show you what my life is like’ We were coming into the hotel in Newquay, and as we were coming along I saw a few people, and looked the other way and saw more people. As I turned back it was as if the pavement had opened up and people emerged hitting the side of the coach and banging in a frenzy. George looked at me and I was absolutely shocked and he said ‘Now do you see and that really hit me. I thought my goodness, this is their life, and in some ways I am responsible for this life as a fan. It was a strange way of living, but all they knew. I felt very honoured, looking out and being a part of this little set.

They made it up as they went along didn’t they?

We didn’t know what we were doing! Paul was in charge. Sylvia stayed behind at one stage with John and George to film on the beach, and I went off with Paul and Ringo, and there is a scene where I am sitting behind Ringo and his Aunt Jessie. Ringo was ad-libbing, and we were all laughing and Paul said ‘I don’t want you laughing! I had to sit there deadpan.

Paul was very professional and without any doubt was the leader. That really showed. I went to see Backbeat at your recommendation, and thought it was absolutely brilliant, and I could see then where Paul stood in the scheme of things and that’s how it was – Paul saying I want this to be a success, this is what we are going to do.

We saw two previews of Magical Mystery Tour, one just for the fan club secretaries, at which John and George came along too. A couple of days later there was a fancy dress party with everyone there, where it was shown again. I remember that at the party I really felt like a drink of water, and grabbed a glass, and it turned out to be vodka! I spent the first part of the party on the floor of the ladies loo! George’s mum took me under her wing and said ‘OK, I’m going to look after you now. She wrote letters to me later and said she was going to adopt me! The party was great, I got to dance with Lulu, Robert Morley played Father Christmas. He was a famous actor and I had to go and sit on his lap!

The first time to see Magical Mystery Tour on my own with my family around me, we were waiting for something like A Hard Day’s Night and it didn’t happen, and I remember feeling quite embarrassed as I didn’t know what it was about.

We had an open invitation to Abbey Road. On the last day of filming at West Malling, John said they were recording and we should come along whenever we liked! I checked it out with George and he said it was OK too. That was the first time I was in there watching and hearing them sing – I sat there and thought – ‘Wow – it the Beatles!

They were recording I Am the Walrus. I went in with John Lennon, and as I walked in I saw Cliff Richard and shouted at John ‘There’s Cliff!’ like a crazed fan.

I was sitting behind a soundproof screen and some girls came in. A little while later George came up to me, and asked if it was OK if your friends leave. I said ‘What friends?’ And they said those girls over there. I said I didn’t know them. They’d come in and said they were with me!

I fell asleep in the studio as it was very late at night – I heard someone say ‘She’s asleep!’ And it was Ringo. George came along with a cup of tea and some biscuits. It was 3 o’clock in the morning! George got me a taxi to make sure I got home. He gave me a kiss goodbye as I got into the taxi. The taxi driver got down to Trafalgar Square without saying a word, and he then said ‘Do you know that was one of the Beatles?’ I said ‘really? I thought it was the milkman!’

George used to talk to me about getting hold of a book called ‘Autobiography of a yogi. This was while we were still on Magical Mystery Tour.

There was one occasion when we were in Abbey Road and they were passing around joints. It was passed to me, but George took it out of my hands and said, “She doesn’t need it, she’s the only person who’s got the philosophy without the drugs. I was very touched he saw that in me. That’s a great memory carry with me.

George had asked me a few times what I was doing and I said I was still at school. He said ‘what do want to be at school for? He said to me why don’t I come to work at Apple? They had opened the shop, and Jenni Boyd was leaving, so by this time I said Oh, all right then, so I went to work in the Apple shop. I stayed there until the ‘great giveaway’. I went to Savile Row a few times too, and got given the ‘Two Virgins’ album for my 18th birthday. I left it on the train as I was too embarrassed to take it home! I gradually lost touch with the Beatles after that.

What was the Apple shop like?

‘Magic Alex’ was around with his ‘dream machine’ in the back room. It was a strange place. There was Caleb – The manager of the shop, and a few people who I wondered whether they should be there or not! The Fool came in quite regularly and made me a coat. They had a basement flat where they made some wonderful creations. The flat was in Montagu Square.

To get into the shop you had to hold a handle in the shape of a hand. George and Ringo came in a lot, and Yoko, and Kyoko, with her nanny. One day I was in the shop when Ringo came in. We were walking down the stairs and we realised it was like ‘Your Mother Should Know’ – we both starting singing it and he danced me down the stairs. Pattie and Jenni used to come in regularly. To me, though, it was just a job, not particularly out of the ordinary. It was the inside looking out thing again. The outside world looked freaky to us and we were protected.

Was it sudden when it closed down?

Yes, we didn’t know a thing! Though I’d had bad vibes – I was having my lunch break one day, when I felt that I must go home. I had this feeling that something awful was going to happen, but we had no idea. As I went out the door, John, Yoko and some others came in and ransacked the place, taking anything they wanted. The next day they just said to give everything away. I got up to serve someone and they took my chair! They said we could take anything before it goes. I got the doll. They were called Clarence and Clarissa, for some reason, and there was a baby Clarence and baby Clarissa. I had all four, but gave three of them away. Clarissa had red hair, like Jane Asher, they were based on the Beatles partners. I’ve still got Clarence. He’s a bit grubby now though.

I have one of the labels. It used to have clothes attached.

After the shop closed, I could have got a job at 3 Savile Row, but I wasn’t pushy and thought it was time to move on.

Jeni Crowley and friends outside the Apple Shop in July 1968 - waiting to be picked up to attend he Premiere of Yellow Submarine
Jeni Crowley and friends outside the Apple Shop in July 1968 – waiting to be picked up to attend he Premiere of Yellow Submarine
Jeni with John Lennon during the filming of Magical Mystery Tour
Jeni with John Lennon during the filming of Magical Mystery Tour

The Beatles Come to Town!

Here is the original ‘Beatles Come to Town’ film -as made by Pathé News,  shot at the Manchester ABC, Ardwick on November 20th 1963. I was one year old a day later, so unfortunately wasn’t there! Excerpts from the film are used in The Beatles, Eight Day’s A Week, the Touring Years, but rather strangely, the audio has been replaced on some of it by audio from the Beatles Live at the Holywood Bowl! Why??

This was filmed on 35mm, especially to be shown as a short film in a cinema, before the main feature came on. The newsreels gave the audience news and information before television became widely available. However, by the 1960s, it was getting rather out-dated. However, I also love the commentaries by Bob Danvers Walker – a legend of British broadcasting.

 

 

The Beatles Live in Melbourne 1964

Although there was some ‘new’ colour footage from this gig in ‘The Beatles Eight Day’s a Week – the touring years, I think it was a missed opportunity not having more from this amazing show from Melbourne in 1964.

The scenes in Australia were if anything more riotous than in the US. When the Beatles arrived in Adelaide, something like half the population lined a motorcade from the airport to their hotel!

I think this is one of the best filmed Beatles performances. Unlike Shea, the sound has not been ‘doctored’ – ie there have been no overdubs made, yet the Beatles sound great! For me, You Can’t Do That and Long Tall Sally are the stand out songs.

I especially love the end of Long Tall Sally, when a guy looking exactly like John Lennon, manages to get on stage, and shakes John’s hand in the middle of the song!!

Hopefully, in the not too distant future, we will get an official DVD of The Beatles full concert performances. If we do, this show must be included.

 

September 24th 1941 – Remembering Linda McCartney

Remembering Linda McCartney, who was born on September 24th 1941 – 75 years ago today.

I met Linda with Paul on many occasions. I think the nicest was in June 1983 outside MPL. I had a day off work, and it was a lovely summer’s day, and I decided to meet a couple of Beatles friends in Soho Square. We thought Paul might be at MPL, that overlooked the square, but that would have been a bonus, as it was such a nice day to lounge about in the square.

We were in luck though, as Paul and Linda were indeed at MPL, in seemingly in very good spirits. They came to the window a couple of times and Paul saw us, and did silly dances for our benefit. When they were due to leave, Paul and Linda beckoned us over. They were very chatty and relaxed. I had a copy of Mike McCartney’s then new book ‘Thank U Very Much with me and I asked Paul and Linda to sign it, and they gave me huge autographs on the title page. I also had a camera with me, and Linda asked whether I wanted a photo, and called Paul over to pose especially for me :>)

A few months later I met Mike McCartney at the Beatles convention in Liverpool, and got him to sign the book too. When he saw I already had it signed by Paul and Linda, he wrote ‘and well done’ under his autograph.

Linda was very much the love of Paul’s life, and I’m sure he will be thinking of her too today.

 

Paul and Linda at MPL
Paul and Linda at MPL
The autographs of Paul, Linda and Mike McCartney
The autographs of Paul, Linda and Mike McCartney3

Guide to the Beatles London – available in print or as an EBook

Guide to the Beatles London by Richard Porter is now available in print,
on Amazon Kindle, and iBooks Store!
It has been fully revised since the print version, with many more places, stories and photos!

The sixties were a fun time when everything came together, and London was fab – it really was then, … it was really jumping. And there were The Beatles and the pirate radio stations and all that, and a general loosening up. Of course the war had gone by then and rationing had finished so people started throwing their legs in the air and having a good time. It was a good place to be, around London, in the sixties.Kenny Everett, DJ and producer of the Beatles Christmas records

About the Book

 

  • walking tour of Beatles sites in Central London and also details of sites further out from the centre
  • maps and directions how to get there
  • an essential souvenir of the London Beatles walking tours, plus an independent guide to many more Beatles places in London not visited on the tours
  • scores of previously unpublished and rare photos, including The Beatles at their homes and in Abbey Road Studios
  • stories from people who worked with the Beatles, including Alistair Taylor, Brian Epstein’s personal assistant, top record producer Alan Parsons and top DJ Kenny Everett
  • written by Richard Porter – professional Beatles tour guide, former editor ‘Off the Beatle Track’ magazine and renowned Beatles expert
  • unique content and professional design make it an ideal momento of your trip to London, or a special present for your Beatle fan friend!

 

Contents: The book is divided into the followings sections

 

  • The Story of The Beatles in London. A chronological history from their first visit to London to their break-up.
  • A walking tour of The Beatles London. A three hour walking tour around major Beatles locations in Central London.
  • Drive My Car. Other Beatles locations in and around London.
  • Further Information for Beatles Fans. More information of use to Beatles fans coming to London.

 

Places included in the book include Abbey Road Studios, the former Apple building at 3 Savile Row, the Beatles homes, offices, recording studios and many others. However, the book is more about the people that frequented the buildings, rather than the buildings themselves.

Guide to the Beatles London in available at the Beatles Coffee Shop, or online at http://www.beatlescoffeeshop.com/shop/product.php/2/guide_to_the_beatles_london__guide_book_by_richard_porter