Monthly Archives: October 2016

Give My Regards to Wimpole Street – Where Paul McCartney Lived with the Ashers

Give My Regards to Wimpole St

In an extract from his book ‘Guide to the Beatles London’ Richard Porter tells of the London street where Paul McCartney lived with the Asher Family, and dreamed the tune of ‘Yesterday’

Wimpole Street is a very quiet street in the centre of the medical quarter of London, close to Harley Street – most of the houses are divided into consulting rooms for specialist doctors. It also has literary connections – Elizabeth Barrett lived at number 50 Wimpole Street. She married fellow poet Robert Browning at St Marylebone Church after being kept virtual prisoner in the house for most of her life.

John and Yoko were big fans of the Brownings. Yoko wrote Let Me Count the Ways based on a poem by Elizabeth and John wrote Grow Old With Me, based on a poem by Robert. John apparently saw him and Yoko as re-incarnations of the Brownings. For Christmas 1980 John bought Yoko an original handwriting of Elizabeth Barrett with a portrait framed next to it – he was never able to give them personally to her though…

The quietness of Wimpole Street was interrupted in 1962 when gun shots rang out in nearby Wimpole Mews. 17 Wimpole Mews was the home of Dr Stephen Ward, a society osteopath. Ward had many female friends he liked to introduce to his high society male friends. For instance, he introduced Christine Keeler to John Profumo, Minister of War and also to Major Ivanov of the Russian KGB. Keeler had simultaneous affairs with these two men – at the height of the cold war.

On 14 December 1962 a spurned lover of Keeler, Johnny Edgecombe, arrived at Wimpole Mews with a gun and started shooting. The story was all over the press the next day and finally led to the uncovering of the ‘Profumo Affair’ which led to the resignation of Profumo, the ultimate downfall of the Government and the suicide of Steven Ward. It was alleged by Philip Norman, in his book ‘Shout!’ that the press saw Beatlemania as an antidote to the revelations around the Profumo affair.

Number 57 Wimpole Street is now a private clinic. It just also happens to be where Lennon/McCartney wrote their first US number one and Paul dreamt the tune of the most covered song of all time. The house was bought by the Asher family in 1957 when they moved from a flat in Great Portland Street. Dr Richard Asher was an eminent doctor who specialised in mental health. His wife Margaret was professor of music at Guildhall School of music. She taught a young man called George Martin how to play the oboe. They had three children: Claire and Jane were both actresses and son Peter was a singer.

Jane Asher started acting when only 5 years old and made her film debut soon afterwards. Later, at aged 14, she was the youngest actress to play Wendy in Peter Pan. By 1963 she was a regular on the TV show Juke Box Jury – where celebrities reviewed the records of the week.

On 18 April 1963 Jane did a photographic assignment for Radio Times at a concert called ‘Swinging Sounds ’63’ at the Albert Hall. She sat in the audience with a reporter and a photographer who recorded her reactions. When the Beatles came on stage she screamed. Jane met all four Beatles backstage – apparently all four were very impressed by her – especially George, it was alleged later – but she got on better with Paul. They were seen in public together for the first time shortly afterwards and from then on Paul was continually asked whether he was going to marry Jane. Paul even made fun of this in ‘A Hard Day’s Night’ when answered ‘No, we’re just good friends’ even before the question was asked.

Paul got on very well with the Asher family and jumped at the chance when the Ashers asked him if he would like to make their family home his London base. Paul was given a room at the top of house at the back – it was almost a self contained apartment with its own bathroom. Paul once compared it to an artist’s garret. It had a bed, easy chair, record player and small piano. Under the bed Paul kept his gold records and his MBE! Peter Asher had the room next door and Claire and Jane’s rooms were below. Even though Paul and Jane had separate rooms they regularly slept together – the Asher’s were a very liberal family.

Paul and Jane were often apart. Paul, of course, was often on tour with The Beatles and Jane was often away on acting assignments. Paul seemed to resent that Jane wasn’t there all the time. Jane certainly inspired Paul to write songs: Here There and Everywhere, And I Love Her and Every Little Thing were all about Jane. However, the relationship wasn’t all champagne and roses, he also wrote I’m Looking Through You, For No One and You Won’t See Me about her.

Mr and Mrs Asher were very protective of Paul. Paul’s fans heard where he was living soon after he moved in, and fans camped outside the house almost continually. To help Paul get in and out of the house Dr Asher devised an elaborate escape route for Paul. He had to climb onto a foot wide parapet along to the right and into the flat of a retired colonel at No. 56. He then went right down to the basement flat of a young couple who used to let him through their kitchen window and into their garage. Then Paul went out of the street door by 10 Browning Mews and did a left through an archway into New Cavendish St.

Mrs Asher offered to teach Paul how to read and write music notation but after a few lessons Paul gave up. He still can’t read music notation to this day. However, Mrs Asher did succeed is teaching Paul how to play the recorder. Paul can be heard playing the instrament on Fool on the Hill.

When the nearby Post Office Tower was being built Dr. Asher watched the building’s progress from his bedroom window. Just before it opened he wrote to the owners, the GPO, asking if he could visit the tower with his family. He turned up with Peter and Jane and Paul McCartney! The owners were amazed to see two world famous pop stars and a world famous actress in their new building.

Paul immediately struck up a friendship with Peter and his friend Gordon Waller who sang under the name Peter and Gordon and wrote A World Without Love especially for them. It reached number one in the UK charts. Peter also became involved in a project to start an art gallery and bookshop with two friends Barry Miles and John Dunbar. Paul was also very interested in the project and donated money so it could open. It was called the Indica Art Gallery and was where John met Yoko in November 1966.

Mrs Asher’s music room was in the basement of the house. John Lennon was a regular visitor to the house and he and Paul regularly used the music room to write songs. It was not long after Paul moved in that they wrote I Want to Hold Your Hand down there. Gordon Waller remembers that John was on a pedal organ and Paul on a piano. John later remembered they wrote the song ‘eyeball to eyeball’. They had the ‘you’ve got that something’ line when Paul hit a key on the piano and John looked up and said ‘That’s It!’ – they had the link that made the song.

Early one morning Paul woke up in his bedroom with a tune in his head. He went straight over to the piano he had by the bed to play it. He called the tune Scrambled Eggs. Paul initially thought he was remembering the tune from someone else’s and went around his friends asking if they recognised it. No-one did so Paul finally realised that he had dreamt the tune and wrote some proper words to it. He called it Yesterday.

When Paul actually had this dream seems to confuse him; in two different authorised biographies Paul gives different dates. In Yesterday and Today he said it was late 1963 – in Many Years From Now he states it was 1965.

In 1965 Paul bought a house in Cavendish Avenue, St John’s Wood, just around the corner from Abbey Road. Paul took some time to do it up, with Jane’s help, and they both moved in a few months later. However, they started to drift apart – especially when Jane went on tour to America with the Bristol Old Vic touring company. When Jane came back, Paul was heavily into drugs and Jane didn’t join in.

Paul and Jane announced their engagement on Christmas Day 1967, but broke up in May 1968. Paul wanted Jane to give up her acting career and start a family but she refused.

Tragically, Dr Asher committed suicide at 57 Wimpole Street in 1969. Not surprisingly, the Asher family moved out soon afterwards.

Jane is continuing her very successful acting career and also had her own lifestyle TV programme on the BBC called ‘Good Living’. She is married to cartoonist Gerald Scarfe, who made a satirical papier mache model of The Beatles that was shown on the front cover of Time magazine in 1967.

Peter Asher worked for a time as A and R man of Apple records. Allegedly, when Paul broke up with Jane he stormed into Apple the next morning to sack Peter as an act of revenge – Paul later changed his mind but soon after Peter left Apple with his discovery James Taylor and masterminded his career, along with that of Linda Rondstadt. Peter is now a top record company executive in America.

A few years ago I had the unique opportunity of visiting the house with a reporter from the Times newspaper, who was writing an article on it. The house, at the time, was owned by John Carlotta, who was the former manager of Deep Purple. Throughout the house were many gold records for songs like ‘Smoke on the Water’.

57 Wimpole Street was sold for about two million pounds in the early 2000’s and is now a private clinic.

Richard Porter

57 Wimpole Street is one of the places visited on Richard Porter’s London Beatles Walks. For more information see http://www.beatlesinlondon.com

Richard’s book ‘Guide to the Beatles London’ is available at the Beatles Coffee Shop, St John’s Wood.

Paul's escape route from his bedroom at 57 Wimpole Street
Paul’s escape route from his bedroom at 57 Wimpole Street
Paul's bedroom at 57 Wimpole Street
Paul’s bedroom at 57 Wimpole Street

An Interview with Robert Whitaker

Robert Whitaker was the official photographer of The Beatles from 1964-1966 and went on many tours with them. His most notorious picture appeared on the US Album ‘Yesterday and Today’ – the infamous ‘Butcher’ cover. 

Here, Bob tells Richard and Irina Porter about  touring with the Beatles, and how the ‘Butcher’ cover came about.

I believe you first met the Beatles in Australia on their 1964 tour. How did that come about?

  • I had to photograph Brian Epstein for a newspaper. There weren’t that many photographers who wanted to photograph Brian Epstein. So all of a sudden I am in the hotel, all of a sudden I met the Beatles.

In Australia they had thousands of people outside the hotel.

Two hundred thousand people.

What was it like getting into the hotel?

  • I cannot remember now, but I think there was a barrier, there was access to the hotel for the guests. You had to have a permission to go. The concierge would know that you had things to do. They knew we were coming, so we got in.

You met the Beatles soon after you met Brian, did you?

  • Yes, the same day. No, the next day.

Then Brian employed you as a photographer after that.

– He wanted to manage me. I said, ‘I don’t want to be managed’. Then six months later I thought, maybe, I do. So I came to England.

You were with them for nearly 2 years.

1964 to 66. Two and a half years.

You went on quite a few tours, did you?

Yeah, I went to America round England, I photographed them in studios here. Then we went to Germany and Japan. That was the end.

This exhibition is on the Japan tour. How different that was compared to, say, America, the year before? Was it more restrained?

  • I think it was the most elegantly promoted exhibition of their work, their music, that was prepared for them. America’s pretty rough and ready – ‘You are here, sing!’ Japan, they really seem to have great respect, so they had a beautiful hotel, nice cars to drive to and from the hotel. Budokan was a nice place. The promoters were very good. And the concerts were fairly restrained because I do not think Beatles fans in Japan knew quite how to scream like in Europe and America. So the Beatles could hear themselves singing. And they realised they were not singing in tune.

They were not used to it, were they?

  • No, they were not.

Were you aware, although the security was very tight because of the death threats, playing in the Budokan, the big martial arts place.

Yes, I’ve just been told it was a judo place, not sumo. I always thought it was sumo.

The Beatles were not allowed out of their hotel.

  • It was not so much a question of not being allowed. I think what the promoter and the security had thought, which is probably bullshit, that they might be mobbed, they might have somebody walk up and blast them

  • As they did eventually, kill John.

In the Anthology they talked about how the Beatles were regimented, how they had to be at a certain place at the certain time to the minute. Were you aware of that at the time?

  • It is evident in some of the photographs around the corner and in the window. They had to be there by the second. Of course, they did not adhere to that. They had to go on stage at a certain time, and it did not actually matter what time they arrived. They knew they were going on stage. I cannot really answer all these questions because I am not a Beatle, in fairness to them.

Was it evident to you at the time that they were fed up with touring?

  • When we got to The Philippines. Then again the whole thing changed again. They’d never been spat at or shoved around, – ‘pick up your own amplifiers, who the hell are you?’. I remember being in the aeroplane and them being very upset what had happened – and it wasn’t really their fault.

You had exclusive access to them in their hotel rooms. Did you become good friends of theirs?

With John – we’d see each other before and after – we were always good friends. Paul in Anthology I thought wrote very well about the ‘butcher sleeve’. George was always a bit against it. Ringo was always good fun. We all got on – we were all close in age. I was about 6 months older than John.

There are some very good photos in your book of The Beatles painting together. Was that their idea?

Pretty well, yes, what happened was that because they were impounded in their hotel, Paul had asked for some paints and started painting all sorts of things. The promoter suggested they all did a piece of artwork together that could be given away to charity. He provided all the paint all the brushes beautiful paper and we stuck a lamp in the middle of this paper – it was the only source of light I had to work with. It took two nights and days to do it. Whilst they were doing it they were playing an acetate of Revolver and deciding on the order of the tracks.

I wanted to ask you about two people who passed away recently that I’m sure you knew – Alf Bicknell and Alistair Taylor.

Alistair’s dead? I saw Alistair in Liverpool last year and he was very sad he wasn’t mentioned once in Anthology even though he did do a great deal of work for The Beatles. He was in Brian’s office and they didn’t see what output that Alistair put in.

Alf and I were in a car together in Manila and I’m screaming away and I’ve got a gun stuck in my neck. Guns don’t bother me and they weren’t going to shoot me – but Alf was panicking. I was very fond of Alf and I saw him last year and spoke to him about 3 weeks before he died because he asked me for some photos of him with The Beatles and they are not that easy to find. I’ve got one or two with him. There’s one of him on a plane with them.

I’m very sad to hear of Alistair – really liked him.

Do you ever see Paul and Ringo?

I haven’t seen Paul since 1966. I saw Ringo at the Genesis book launch recently. I hope to see Paul one day as I hope to congratulate on all the good things he’s done since.

I wanted to ask about the infamous ‘Butcher Cover’. The picture was your idea, to show they were human….

To show they were flesh and blood – which is what they are. Some people would saw them as saints, which they weren’t. I also found that every time we got off the stage girls would have ripped them to bits, had they got the chance, torn them to pieces – that was something to do with the meat. The dolls are really little girls screaming away. There are a lot of false things there like false teeth, false dolls eyes. It was never meant to be the cover.

What is John’s idea to have it as the cover?

No, the images were snatched as soon as I had finished them and sent to America without asking me how I wanted to see it. The sausages are meant to be an umbilical chord coming out of a woman and the whole thing would be put inside the womb of a woman. All you would have had on the record cover was a breast, nipple and big tummy. Inside the tummy is The Beatles holding the umbilical chord. Around all of that would have been transfers of little people blowing trumpets, as they do in frescos. There is another picture of George banging nails into John’s head – he would have had wood grain put over his head so he would be a piece of wood – George would be banging nails into a piece of wood. Another of Ringo being unpacked from a box. Written on the box is ‘2 million’. He would have been a piece of alabaster plaster. The whole thing would have been falseness, dummies, unreality. The back cover would have been the butcher picture, about 2 inches square and the rest of it would have been gold, like a Russian icon that canonises them. I was thinking of Moses coming down from Mount Sinai with the Ten Commandments and finding people worshipping the golden calves – like people did to The Beatles, treating them like gods, but they are not.

What was your reaction to the furore around the sleeve?

I thought it was not my fault! If they had asked me what the artwork was I don’t think it would have been that frightening. I don’t blame people for being upset about it. But as it turns out it actually released John to say that they were pissed off looking like pretty little boys all the time and that they were human beings. It gave them a release.

There is a lot written about the ‘butcher’ sleeve and very little I’ve said about it. I’ve never written anything by hand. It’s nearly 40 years ago since I did it and it’s hard to recreate the train of thought when I did it.

You were involved in Oz magazine later

Yes, I knew Martin Sharpe and we did the D’Isreali Gears cover together. Martin came to England and we lived together in a studio. Richard Neville then came over and we all knew each other and we decided to start Oz here. It was a whole new episode, but a great one – it was great fun, pioneering satire, taking the piss out of the British Empire.

From 1966 to 1970 I went around the world about 15 times doing various assignments, like Mick Jagger in Ned Kelly. I lived with Salvador Dali. The Beatles were a strong 2 ½ years out of 10 years of work. They fill up a third of my archive.

How do you feel about being associated with The Beatles and your other work not so well known.

I did an exhibition where we put some Vietnam pictures next to Beatles ones, Cream, Jagger etc. For the first time I was actually asked questions about being a photographer and not about The Beatles. I get very upset when I give an interview and all I’m asked is what did The Beatles think – as I am not a historian or a Beatle.

What was the most memorable thing about working with The Beatles.

To be able to answer that and pick out one thing I like is difficult as I’ve never done anything I didn’t like. To say is this picture better than another one is hard. I enjoyed photographing Salvador Dali better than The Beatles because he was more humorous. Although I learnt about photo journalism because of my time with The Beatles and recording what they did.

Richard Porter is author of the book ‘Guide to the Beatles’ London’ conducts regular Beatles tours of London. For more information please see http://www.beatlesinlondon.com

 

The infamous 'Butcher' cover - as photographed by Robert Whitaker
The infamous ‘Butcher’ cover – as photographed by Robert Whitaker

October 5th 1962 – The Beatles Release ‘Love me Do’

On October 5th 1962, the Beatles first single ‘Love Me Do’ was released. On the Parlophone ‘red label’, it featured the Beatles recording made on September 4th 1962, with Ringo Starr on drums. This was significant, as originally, the Beatles producer George Martin wasn’t happy with Ringo’s drumming that day, and had the Beatles remake ‘Love Me Do’ on September 11th with session drummer Andy White on drums. Ringo was given a tambourine to bang, much to his ever lasting chagrin.  When it came to the original release though, Ringo’s version was chosen.

Things became confusing months later when Parlophone changed its record label to a black one, and at the same time, substituted the Andy White version of  ‘Love Me Do’ as the single. This led to a big mistake decades later. On October 5th 2012, EMI were due to re-release  ‘Love Me Do’ on its 50th anniversary, in an identical packaging and recording to the original release. We were sent copies of the new single to sell in the Beatles Coffee Shop. However, just 2 days before the release date, we were send an email from EMI to say the release had been cancelled to a ‘production problem’ and that we should send the singles back. Curious to what the problem was, I took a copy home and played it. The ‘problem’ was obvious right from the first few seconds – it was the wrong version of  ‘Love Me Do’! They had used the September 11th with Andy White on drums.

Because of the problem, the re-release of  ‘Love Me Do’ was delayed for several weeks, so missed the 50th anniversary. Rather than send all the copies we had of the rejected version back, I kept a couple. (shhh, don’t tell anyone!)

There have been some more succesful celebrations of the release of ‘Love Me Do’ on its anniversaries.  On the 30th anniversary, I was invited to a special party in Studio Two at Abbey Road. As well as celebrating the anniversary, the British Council launched its new Beatles exhibition, including a video that included a section of me and members of the London Beatles Fanclub having a meeting at the Liverpool Beatles convention.

At the party, Apple MD Neil Aspinall, and reps from EMI, cut the 30th anniversary cake, which had been baked by Paul McCartney’s ex, Jane Asher!

Paul McCartney at Abbey Road Studios, October 5th 1982, the 20th anniversary of the release of Love Me Do
Paul McCartney at Abbey Road Studios, October 5th 1982, the 20th anniversary of the release of Love Me Do
The cake to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Love Me Do - as designed by Jane Asher!
The cake to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Love Me Do – as designed by Jane Asher!

October 4th 1963 – The Beatles on Ready Steady Go!

October 4th 1963 – The Beatles made their debut appearance on Ready, Steady, Go!

Broadcast on the ITV network, initially just in London, RSG! was British television’s leading pop music show at the time. The 4 October 1963 episode was broadcast live, with the performers miming to their hits, a typical situation for the time.

The show was recorded at Television House on London’s Kingsway. During the afternoon The Beatles rehearsed for the cameras, and recording took place from 6.15pm onwards. The Beatles mimed to Twist and Shout, She Loves You, and I’ll Get Tou and were interviewed by guest host,  Dusty Springfield, and host Keith Fordyce.  Also, Paul McCartney judged four teenage girls miming to Brenda Lee’s ‘Let’s Jump the Broomstick, choosing 13-year-old Melanie Coe as winner. Three years later, after Coe’s disappearance from her family made the front page of the Daily Mirror.  McCartney used the article as the basis for ‘She’s Leaving Home’.

The Beatles with Dusty Springfield, Eden Kane, Keith Fordyce, and Helen Shapiro on Ready Steady Go
The Beatles with Dusty Springfield, Eden Kane, Keith Fordyce, and Helen Shapiro on Ready Steady Go

 

3rd October 1964 – the Beatles on Shindig

On this day in 1964, the Beatles filmed a special live performance for the American TV show ‘Shindig!’ at the Granville Theatre in Fulham. The songs included Kansas City/Hey Hey Hey and I’m a Loser, from the forthcoming ‘Beatles For Sale’ album, which wouldn’t be released for another month.

The Granville Theatre, in Walham Green, Fulham, was opened in 1898 and designed by Frank Matcham, who designed many other theatres, such as the London Palladium. It was knocked down in 1971.

 

The Granville Theatre, one of Frank Matcham's most gothic designs.
The Granville Theatre, one of Frank Matcham’s most gothic designs.

October 2nd 2012 – Paul McCartney, Victor Spinetti, and a Magical Mystery Tour

October 2nd 2012 – a day I will never forget. A day I attended 2 very memorable events, with Paul McCartney at both!!

The afternoon was the memorial service to Victor Spinetti at St Paul’s Church, Covent Garden. Victor had died a few weeks before. I had got to know Victor quite well through various Beatles conventions, and interviewed him for the British Beatles Fan Club at the City Barge pub, that features in Help! I later found out that my birth mother was born only a mile or so from Victor in South Wales, and used to buy fish and chips in the Spinetti family’s fish and chip shop!

Victor had a profound effect on me, especially when I first met him at the 1981 Beatles Convention in Liverpool. I was very sad to hear about his passing, and was determined to attend his memorial service. I rang the church a few days before and told of my family connection, and was invited along.

I was amazed when I got there to see so many famous faces.

It was a lovely occasion, moving at times, but in the main, a wonderful fun celebration of Victor’s life. The tone was set by Fr. Simon Grigg, who said that during his life, Victor was an atheist – but now he knows different!
The programme was a mixture of song and readings, plus very nice tributes to Victor from Barbara Windsor and Jim Davidson.
The musical highlight was Michael Ball singing ‘In My Life’. As he put it, with one of the composers sitting feet away from him.
Fenella Fielding read John Lennon’s poem, Fat Budgie, to celebrate Victor’s collaboration with John on the play ‘In His Own Write’.
Paul McCartney arrived at the church just before the service started. It seems that he initially didn’t think he was going to make it, and sent a written tribute to be read out. Instead he read it himself.
He remembered at one of the Beatles first meetings with Victor, he told them to look at a cloud in the sky and that he would make it go away – and it did! Paul said that, when thinking of Victor that morning, he tried to do the same thing. However the cloud he got didn’t go away, it just got bigger and bigger. Paul joked that it was actually Victor.

Barbara Windsor, who was one of Victor’s best friends, remembered when they were both in a touring stage show, and due to lack of rooms, had to share a bed in a hotel. Barbara, then the ‘sex bomb’ of the ‘Carry On’ films etc, said she never felt so safe in her life! Of course, Victor was gay.
The service lasted about an 75 minutes and we left the church to a recording of the Beatles Magical Mystery Tour.
Afterwards I was mingling outside, when Paul McCartney came up to me, shook my hand and said “Hi Richard, how are you going, haven’t seen you for a while.” It’s nice he remembers me :>)

Although everyone was sad about Victor’s passing, the service was very funny in places – and Fr. Grigg said at the end that he’d never heard so many ‘F’ words in a church before!
A lovely service for a lovely man.

A section of the service – including Paul  McCartney’s speech https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFfsPFkjTEQ&playnext=1&list=PL03C5D18AB9E99DCF&feature=results_video

You can see me in the audience at about 7 mins 4 seconds :>)

A report on the service http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2211815/Actor-Victor-Spinetti-star-Beatles-films-died-aged-82-cancer-battle.html

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Paul McCartney arriving at St Paul's Church
Paul McCartney arriving at St Paul’s Church

Attending the service would have been a highlight of most day’s – but mine didn’t end there. That evening, I attended a special gala screening of Magical Mystery Tour. I was the guest of Jeni Crowley, who was on the original Magical Mystery Tour coach, and appears in the film. Sitting with us were Sylvia Bodhi Hillier, and Leslie Cavendish, who were also on the coach, and Roy Benson, who edited the film.
Amongst the celebrities in the audience were Liam Gallagher, Paul Weller, Neil Innes, David Walliams, Peter Asher, Barry Miles, Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam, Mark Lewisohn, and Joe Boyd. Paul McCartney was there too, and gave a short speech before the screening. He seemed surprised to see me again so soon :>) I was sitting right in front of Liam Gallagher, and I could hear him singing along to I am the Walrus.
At first we saw the BBC ‘Arena’ programme about the making of Magical Mystery Tour, and after a short break, the film itself. Magical Mystery Tour looked and sounded great on a big screen, and it was wonderful seeing it with so many of the people that appeared in it.

…A Day in the Life!!!

Pic I took of Paul with Liam Gallagher at the screening of Magical Mystery Tour
Pic I took of Paul with Liam Gallagher at the screening of Magical Mystery Tour